| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Social distancing? Try a better way to work remotely on your online files. Dokkio, a new product from PBworks, can help your team find, organize, and collaborate on your Drive, Gmail, Dropbox, Box, and Slack files. Sign up for free.

View
 

My Project

Page history last edited by Nate Yarnes 4 years, 9 months ago

The goal of my project was to build a devices that could facilitate my need to study and use my time efficiently. 

 

 

When I started brainstorming ideas for my device I first began to search for a need in my academic life. At the time I was taking CTL53: a course where we studied different research proven strategies on studying and learning effectively. One of the strategies was a way to efficiently work in intervals of intensive studying and then a short break; this was called the “pomodoro” strategy. As part of our assignment for CTL53, we were required to implement the pomodoro strategy into our routine studying. I used my phone to set a 25 minute timer and when that was finished a 5 minute timer for a break. When I had to set the timer on my phone and check and see how much time I had left, I was using my attention and short term memory inefficiently. I needed a way to time and alert myself when implementing the pomodoro strategy; I needed a device.

 

I started my design with the metaphor on the verplank diagram: an egg timer. The egg timer is an interactive device that was similar to what I needed, but it required to much interfacing (setting the times and operating the twist control each work and break interval). I wanted to include the simplest controls available and the best way to interact the device that i could think would be to control it using an accelerometer. The physically reorienting the box instead of operating any button controls seemed like the easiest way to access different functions. The proximity sensory in lab 3 would also be an easy way to operate the device, however I couldn’t get consistent analog values from that thing so I didn’t trust it. 

 

My next step was to think of the other components of the Verplank Diagram and draft a state diagram. I changed my mind over the course of two weeks about a lot of things by asking questions like what controls should I use? Who is this device for, is it for my specific needs of universal needs? What should the user be able to control? Should I include battery power or should I use external power? Three days before I was meant to propose my project to David, I felt like i had answered these questions and I knew what my device was meant to do and how I should build it. After David’s feedback on my ideas and plans to build the devices, I modified that state diagram and ordered the battery and breakout board.

 

The next thing I began thinking about was was kind of enclosed I should build. I discussed my plans with the TAs in Room 36 and used their feedback to estimate how long the enclosure would take, how big I should make it, and what materials I should use.

 

After I had planned the enclosure, these are the materials and components I decided to use:

The goal of my project was to build a devices that could facilitate my need to study and use my time efficiently. 

 

 

When I started brainstorming ideas for my device I first began to search for a need in my academic life. At the time I was taking CTL53: a course where we studied different research proven strategies on studying and learning effectively. One of the strategies was a way to efficiently work in intervals of intensive studying and then a short break; this was called the “pomodoro” strategy. As part of our assignment for CTL53, we were required to implement the pomodoro strategy into our routine studying. I used my phone to set a 25 minute timer and when that was finished a 5 minute timer for a break. When I had to set the timer on my phone and check and see how much time I had left, I was using my attention and short term memory inefficiently. I needed a way to time and alert myself when implementing the pomodoro strategy; I needed a device.

 

I started my design with the metaphor on the verplank diagram: an egg timer. The egg timer is an interactive device that was similar to what I needed, but it required to much interfacing (setting the times and operating the twist control each work and break interval). I wanted to include the simplest controls available and the best way to interact the device that i could think would be to control it using an accelerometer. The physically reorienting the box instead of operating any button controls seemed like the easiest way to access different functions. The proximity sensory in lab 3 would also be an easy way to operate the device, however I couldn’t get consistent analog values from that thing so I didn’t trust it. 

 

My next step was to think of the other components of the Verplank Diagram and draft a state diagram. I changed my mind over the course of two weeks about a lot of things by asking questions like what controls should I use? Who is this device for, is it for my specific needs of universal needs? What should the user be able to control? Should I include battery power or should I use external power? Three days before I was meant to propose my project to David, I felt like i had answered these questions and I knew what my device was meant to do and how I should build it. After David’s feedback on my ideas and plans to build the devices, I modified that state diagram and ordered the battery and breakout board.

 

The next thing I began thinking about was was kind of enclosed I should build. I discussed my plans with the TAs in Room 36 and used their feedback to estimate how long the enclosure would take, how big I should make it, and what materials I should use 

 

To laser cut the faces of the two displays  into one of the 3.5x3.5 wooden pieces I measured the displays using digital calipers. 

 

Nokia display: 40mm x 34mm

LCM display: 24.55mm x 71.30mm

 

The vertical space between the displays is ≈13.75mm 

(the displays are mounted on female breakaway headers that flex and the level position is approximately 13.5-14mm)

 

The distance between the tops of PCBs on the two displays is ≈81.5mm

 

 

After I had planned the size of the enclosure, these are the components I decided to use:

Battery

https://www.adafruit.com/products/258

34mm x 62mm x 5mm / 1.3" x 2.4" x 0.2"

1200mAh at 3.7V

23g

 

Microcontroller

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/arduinoBoardMicro

48 mm x 18 mm

13g

 

Charger

https://www.adafruit.com/products/1904

21mm x 19mm x 2mm

2g

 

Audio Encoder

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11684

38 x 44.5mm

5g

 

Display

http://www.wvshare.com/product/LCD1602-blue.htm

24 g

80 x 36 x 12.5

 

Speaker

http://www.jameco.com/1/1/25741-fe200cwp-round-ferrite-speaker-paper-diaphragm.html

 

50mm x 18

34g

 

 

 

Things I should have done:

  1. I should have flipped the orientation of the perf board with the components and only made wire connections on the side with the components and only solder on the opposite side.
  2. I should have implemented a step up between the breakout board and the Arduino so that the 5v output was fully functional.

 

 

 

Comments (1)

zahraa@... said

at 5:47 pm on Aug 18, 2015

Dear Nate,

We really like your idea of making a programmable timer that alert people about working and break time.
The process is very organized and well written. I could clearly understand what steps you took to create the project and how you overcame the challenges you were faced with. The photos associated are also nicely descriptive.
Nice video of the project working and I like that you showed it working immediately.

The only thing that would have been nice is a system diagram and a schematic of the circuit and breakouts that you integrated together.

Overall:
You did a great job with your project and documentation and we hope you had fun!

Best,
Zahra, David, Dongao, Praveen, Samyuktha, Tian, Xiangyu

You don't have permission to comment on this page.